Pork

Pork Gyozas

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I have been using this same recipe for years, simple ingredients – equals simple flavours! You can cook them like Gyozas (pan fry one side and then steam at the end), steam, boil, add to soup or broth, or deep fry for something naughty. I’ve tried them every way and they are delicious! The recipe is very adaptable if you wish to add chilli or use chicken mince, prawn or a mix, just be adventurous. They can be frozen once assembled and will last in the freezer for 2-3 months. Just thaw in the fridge overnight before cooking.

Lastly serve them with a Japanese Soy Dipping Sauce or if deep fried Okanami Sauce and Japanese Mayo – oh so very sinful!


Pork Gyozas


Ingredients

500 g pork mince

1/2   wombok (Chinese cabbage), core removed from each leaf and finely shredded

3 green onions/shallots/spring onion, white removed and finely chopped

2 garlic clove, crushed

4 teaspoon light soy sauce

4 teaspoon shoaxing wine

2 teaspoon sesame oil

1 teaspoon caster sugar

Pinch of ground white pepper

48 gyoza or gowgee wrapper, 2 packets

2 – 4 teaspoon peanut oil

1/4 cup (60ml) water

Japanese soy sauce, to serve


  1. Combine the pork, wombok, green onion, garlic, soy sauce, sake, sesame oil, caster sugar and pepper in a medium bowl, mix all together with your hands.
  2. Place gyoza wrapper, about 6 at a time on a clean surface, put a teaspoon of filling in the middle of each one, wetting the edges as you go, fold over to make a half moon and pleat the edges together. Its a bit fiddly the first time, but you will get the hang of it. Repeat this process until all filling is used. If you have filling left over, it can be frozen. You can also freeze the gyozas at this stage, make sure they dont touch each other and separate the layers with baking paper.
  3. Heat the peanut oil in a large frying pan over high heat until just smoking. Remove from heat. Arrange dumplings over the base of the frying pan. Return to the heat and cook for 2 minutes or until the base of the dumplings are golden. Sprinkle water evenly over the gyozas. Cook, covered, for 3-4 minutes or until gyozas are cooked through and the water evaporates. Remove from heat and set aside for 2 minutes.Place on a serving platter. Serve immediately with soy sauce or a Japanese dipping sauce.

Spice Rubbed Pork Loin and Brown Rice Quinoa mix with Apple Mint Salsa

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I love cooking with pork loin, it is low in fat, high in protein and provides a rich source of B vitamins and selenium.  Serve it up with some brown rice/quinoa mix and some roast vegetables, and you have a well-balanced, healthy meal. It’s gluten free and can be made paleo.  This recipe is quick and easy to prepare – and even easier to cook. The spiciness of the pork balances so well with the tangy apple mint salsa. You can add the spices to the pork the day before and also make the Apple Mint Salsa.  The pork works well with roast carrot, pumpkin or sweet potato and a nice dollop of greek yoghurt!  It can be eaten hot or cold.


Spice Rubbed Pork Loin and Brown Rice Quinoa mix with Apple Mint Salsa


Ingredients

Spice Rub

1/2 teaspoon cummin

1/2 teaspoon ground coriander

5 cloves, ground in a mortar and pestle

1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds, ground in a mortar and pestle

400-600g pork loin fillet, halved

Apple Mint Salsa*

1/2 cup mint leaves, finely chopped

2 green apples, peeled and finely diced

2 tablespoons white wine vinegar

1 tablespoon honey

 

1 cup dry brown rice quinoa mix, cooked in chicken stock

roasted carrot, pumpkin or sweet potato

1/4 cup greek yoghurt


Method

  1. Pre heat oven to 180c, fan forced. Roast your choice of vegetable to serve.
  2. Combine all the spices in a freezer bag with salt and pepper, place in the pork and shake the bag. Set aside until ready to cook.
  3. Place all the apple mint salsa ingredients in a container and place in the fridge to infuse.
  4. To cook the pork, place an oven proof fry pan over high heat and seal the pork loin till nice and caramelized, 3-5 minutes. Then place in the oven for 12-15 minutes, depending if you like it medium or well done. Remember it will continue cooking whilst resting. Once cooked to your liking set aside under some foil and rest for 10 minutes whilst you prepare your salad.
  5. Re-heat the quinoa if prepared earlier, add a squeeze of lemon juice and a dash of oil, place on plates, top with roasted vegetables. Carve your rested pork, fan over the quinoa and vegetables, top with apple mint salsa and a dollop of greek yoghurt.

*recipe from Donna Hay Cookbook.

 

Momofuku Style Pork Steam Bun

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I have always wanted to try these little pillows of goodness ever since my brother had told me of eating them in New York, I think he paid $8 for 2 tiny ones. With this recipe you will be able to stretch the dollar A LOT further.

The sweet fluffy buns, succulent juicy pork and the freshness  of the pickles will leave you wanting more and more and more….I do have to mention that I cheated on the buns and bought a pre packaged Banh Bao Flour Mix from my local asian supermarket, I didn’t even know they made it pre packaged like this – heaven sent!  The hard work isn’t done for you though, you will still have to knead the dough, let it rest and knead again and roll out. The buns can be made and steamed ahead of time, store in the fridge for 1 day or in the freezer for 2 months. I was lucky enough to have some Pork Belly already poached sitting in the freezer, just defrosted it, sliced into pieces and shallow fried-done! You could also use Char Sui Pork or Peking Duck.

This recipe would have to be one of my favourites, right up there with the Twice Cooked Pork Belly with Citrus Caramel Dressing.


Momofuku Style Pork Steam Buns


Ingredients

1 package of pre mix Banh Bao flour mixture*

1.5 kg Pork Belly, poached in masterstock, sliced into 5cm pieces

1/2 jar hoisin sauce

1 spring onion, finely julienned or sliced

Cucumber Pickle

2 lebanese cucumbers, thickly sliced

1 1/2 tablespoons sugar

1/2 tablespoon salt


Method

  1. To pickle cucumbers, add the salt, sugar and cucumbers to a container or jar, shake to cover and place in the fridge for at least an hour. Its amazing, as the salt and sugar draw all the moisture from the cucumbers and the jar fills up with a beautiful sweet/salty liquid. They will last 1 month in the fridge.
  2. Start the pork buns per packet instructions. I decided to shape mine like envelopes (momofuku style) I have made them the traditional way before and I found this way alot easier “always like easier”. It makes about 12-16 buns. Divide your dough up, roll into circles about 1/2 cm thick, place onto a piece of baking paper, spray the bun and using a chopstick, fold the bun over the chopstick and then remove. First time I did these they stuck together, so the oil should prevent this from happening. Place buns into  a large steamer, be sure not to place them too closely together as they will expand . Buns should take about 10 minutes. Cover the cooked buns with a tea towel and continue with the rest.
  3. Heat enough oil in a large frypan or wok to shallow fry the pork belly, will take about 4 minutes. Drain on paper towel.
  4. To assemble, brush the buns with hoisin, layer with  the pork belly, pickled cucumber and  garnish with spring onion.